Bonn Agreement 1978

We have ordered our representatives to meet by the end of 1978 to consider this declaration. We also intend to have a similar meeting next year at an appropriate time. The Bonn Agreement is the oldest regional agreement put in place by governments to deal with pollution events. 1. The Contracting Parties shall provide for the performance of the secretariat tasks related to this Agreement, taking into account existing provisions under other international conventions for the prevention of marine and air pollution applicable to the same region as this Convention. The original 1969 agreement was replaced in 1983 by a new Bonn agreement covering “other pollutants” and oil. At the time, the European Union (at the time CEE) became a contracting party; and financial rules have been introduced for the reimbursement of costs by one party to another party in cases of mutual assistance. In 1989, the text of the Bonn Agreement was amended to include aerial surveillance for the detection of operational and illegal spills in its area of competence, which entered into force on 1 April 1994. A central debate in the mid-1990s was the prosecution of offences of introduction at sea. The fear was that, despite aerial surveillance of oil spills, no sanctions had been imposed on polluters who violate MARPOL 73/78.

Several seminars were held, which examined different views on the acceptance of evidence from aerial surveillance and oil fingerprints. In addition to the Bonn Agreement, several multilateral agreements exist in the North Sea region: between Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands (DENGERNETH); France and the United Kingdom (MANCHEPLAN); Norway and the United Kingdom (NORBRITPLAN) and Belgium, the Netherlands, France and the United Kingdom (QUADRIPARTITE ZONE). The Heads of State and Government of Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America met in Bonn on 16 and 17 July 1978. The European Community was represented by the President of the European Council and the President of the European Commission to discuss matters falling within the competence of the Community. The first “Agreement on Cooperation in Combating Oil Pollution of the North Sea” was signed in 1969 by the eight countries bordering the North Sea: Belgium, Denmark, Germany, France, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom. . . .